Apoderus coryli (Linnaeus, 1758)

hazel-leaf roller weevil

polyphagous

parasite

The adult beetles make a number of untidy, about oval holes in the lamina. The female makes ± 30 leaf rolls in her life. To this end she makes a cut in the basal part of the leaf, running from the one margin, over the midrib, to a few mm before the opposite margin. By biting wounds in the upper side of the midrib and the thicker side veins she promotes the withering of the leaf. She folds the leaf lengthwise over the midrib, then rolls it from the tip into a neat cylinder and lays (mostly) one egg. In the course of the time the roll drops to the ground. The larva develops within the roll, and also pupates there.

host plants

Alnus glutinosa; Betula pendula; Carpinus betulus; Corylus avellana; Fagus sylvatica; Fagus sylvatica; Pyrus; Quercus; Salix.

Common on hazel, rare on pear, poplar, sallow.

phenology

Univoltine, but with a weak second generation; hibernation mainly as adults.

distribution within Europe

(PESI, 2019).

references

Benedikt, Borovec, Fremuth ao (2010a), Dieckmann (1974a), Rheinheimer & Hassler (2010a), Sáez Bolaño, Blanco Villero & Sánchez Ruiz (2013a), Urban (2014a).

mod 1.iv.2019