Andricus quercuscalicis (Burgsdorf, 1783)

knopper gall

on Quercus, agamous generation

Andricus quercuscalicis gall

Quercus robur, Belgium, prov. Namur, Hour © Jean-Yves Baugnée

Andricus quercuscalicis: young gall on Quercus robur

Quercus robur, Zeewolde, Harderbos © Hans Jonkman: young galls, mid July

Andricus quercuscalicis: agamous generation gall on Quercus robur

slightly older

Andricus quercuscalicis: agamous generation gall on Quercus robur

same gall from above

Andricus quercuscalicis: agamous generation gall on Quercus robur

Quercus robur, Biddinghuizen, Spijkbos © Hans Jonkman: young gall

Andricus quercuscalicis: agamous generation gall on Quercus robur

Quercus robur, Zeewolde, Harderbos © Hans Jonkman: the gall starts to overgrow the acorn

Andricus quercuscalicis: agamous generation gall on Quercus robur

here the acorn is completely engulfed

gall

the gall develops from the inside of the cupula. Young gall can easily be mistaken for Andricus grossularia. in cross section however that is a multilocular galling of the acorn itself. The development of the knopper gall is a completely different one.

host plants

Fagaceae, monophagous

Quercus x haynaldiana, petraea, pubescens, robur.


on Quercus, sexual generation

Andricus quercuscalicis FM gall on Quercus cerris

Quercus cerris, gall (from Houard, 1908a)

Andricus quercuscalicis FM

Quercus cerris, Dronten © Arnold Grosscurt. (The large galls are of Andricus grossulariae.)

host plants

Fagaceae, narrowly monophagous

Quercus cerris, suber.

gall

Ovoid gall, 2.5 mm high, derived from one, strongly enlarged locule; remnants of the other locule are visible at the side of the gall.

synonyms

Cynips quercuscalicis; C. calicis Hartig, 1843, Andricus beyerincki / beijerincki Trotter, 1899; A. cerri Beijerinck, 1885.

notes

The species is found also in regions where Quercus cerris does not naturally occur; it even seems to be on the increase there. It is not clear whether the sexual generation is only facultative, and thus may be skipped, or that the relatively few artificially planted cerris trees are sufficient to maintain the population. See Kofler & Zwander (2009a) and other on this question.

references

Béguinot (2006c), Bellmann (2012a), Blanes-Dalmau, Caballero-López & Pujade-Villar (2017a), Buhr (1965a), Cerasa (2015a), Chinery (2011a), Cogolludo (1921a), Dauphin & Aniotsbehere (1997a), Ellis (2005a), Groom (2011a), Hellrigl (2009a, 2010a) Hellrigl & Bodur (2015a), Houard (1908a), Katılmış & Kıyak (2008a), Kemal & Koçak (2010a), Kofler & Zwander (2009a), Kollár (2007a, 2011a), Koops (2013a), Kwast (2012a, 2014a), Lambinon, Carbonnelle & Claerebout (2015a), Lambinon Schneider & Feitz (2012a), Lehmann & Hannover (2016a), Marković (2014a), Melika (2006a), Melika, Csóka & Pujade-Villar (2000a), Pellizzari (2010a), Redfern & Shirley (2011a), Roques, Cleary, Matsiakh & Eschem (2017a), Roskam (2009a), Schneider (2016a), Tomasi (2014a), Williams (2010a).

mod 4.iv.2019