Plant Parasites of Europe

leafminers, galls and fungi

Trigonaspis megaptera

Trigonaspis megaptera (Panzer, 1801)

on Quercus, asexual generation

Trigonaspis megaptera on Quercus pubescens

Quercus pubescens, Hungary, Kamaraerdő, 25.vii.2017 © László Érsek

Trigonaspis megaptera on Quercus pubescens

detail

Trigonaspis megaptera on Quercus pubescens

larva in opened gall

Trigonaspis megaptera on Quercus pubescens

mouth parts

Trigonaspis megaptera on Quercus pubescens

larva

Trigonaspis megaptera FF on Quercus robur

Quercus robur, Biddinghuizen, Spijk- en Bremerbergbos, 12.x.2017 © Hans Jonkman

Trigonaspis megaptera FF on Quercus robur

detail

Trigonaspis megaptera galls

Quercus robur, Tilburg, de Kaaistoep, 8.x.205

Trigonaspis megaptera opened gall

opened gall

Trigonaspis megaptera FF: galls on Quercus robur

Quercus robur, France, dép. Loiret, Pers-en-Gâtinais, 19.x.2017 © Eugène Vandebeulque

parasite

The galls occur only late in autumn (September-October), often when the leaves are colouring already. The thin-walled galls mostly are arranged in rows at the underside of the leaves, on the major veins. They are more or less reniform and have a characteristic yellowish green colour. At the end of the season they turn brown and become more or less globular.

host plants

Fagaceae, monophagous

Quercus frainetto, petraea, pubescens, pyrenaica, robur.


on Quercus, sexual generation

Trigonaspis cf megaptera FM gall on Quercus robur

Quercus robur, Roggebotzand (Flevoland) © Hans Jonkman

Trigonaspis cf megaptera FM

Quercus robur, Vorden; © Arnold Grosscurt

gall

galls, often hidden by litter, from dormant buds at the foot of mature stems, but also of seedlings and suckers. They are up to a cm in size and have a waxy surface. The colour ranges from white over creme and pink to reddish brown. Galls from April-Juni, mature in May.

host plants

Fagaceae, monophagous

Quercus frainetto, petraea, pubescens, pyrenaica, robur.

synonyms

Trigonaspis renum, Hartig, 1840.

notes

The sexual generation cannot be distinguished from the one of Trigonaspis synaspis. At least in the Netherlands synaspis is much more rare than megaptera (Roskam).

inquilines

Synergus thaumacerus.

parasitoids, predators

Pediobius lysis; Torymus fastuosus.

references

Askew (1961b), Azmaz & Katılmış (2015a), Béguinot (2006a), Bellmann (2012a), Blanes-Dalmau, Caballero-López & Pujade-Villar (2017a), Buhr (1965a), Burton, Carbonnelle, Ellis & Schneider (2019a), Burton, Ellis & Schneider (2022a), Cerasa (2015a), Chinery (2011a), Cogolludo (1921a), Coulianos & Holmåsen (1991a), Dauphin & Aniotsbehere (1997a), Doğanlar (2017a), Eady & Quinlan (1963a), Hellrigl (2009a), Hellrigl & Bodur (2015a), Houard (1908a), Kollár (2007a, 2011a), Koops (2013a), Kwast (2012a, 2014a), Lambinon, Carbonnelle & Claerebout (2015a), Lehmann & Hannover (2016a), Máca (2012a), Meiklejohn (2005a), Melika (2006a), Melika, Csóka & Pujade-Villar (2000a), Mutun & Dinç (2014a), Nieves-Aldrey (2001a), Redfern & Shirley (2011a), Roskam (2009a). Tavares (1905a), Tomasi (2014a), Williams (2010a).

Last modified 28.vi.2022