Pseudomonas syringae van Hall, 1902 pv. syringae

on Prunus

gall

the infection mostly starts on the flowers (to al lesser degree perhaps also the young foliage); initially they are symptomless, but under moist conditions they may collapse collectively. Via the dead flowers the bacterium may penetrate the fruit, but it can also settle in the living wood of the shoot, and expand from there into the whole tree. Bleeding wounds develop en large cankers, and ultimately the tree dies, Secondary infection is possible via pruning and even the fresh scars of fallen leaves,

host plants

Rosaceae, monophagous

Prunus

references

Kennelly, Cazorla, de Vicente ao (2007a), Melgarejo Nárdiz, García-Jiménez ao (2010a), Roques, Cleary, Matsiakh & Eschem (2017a).

mod 4.iv.2019